Spring tide activity up and down Father Thames

Tall Ships001

Visiting craft from overseas have suddenly created much more activity along Father Thames last weekend.  A tall ship from Poland, a Dutch beflagged mine sweeper, a trim new tug dressed overall added even more colour to the ever-increasing fleet of working barges.  Activity of engineering craft doubles, engaged on the workings of the super sewer, which are being sound-proofed for the 24-hour working with new roofs and walls.  These are enclosing the ever-increasing activity as the bore holes extend into the massive tunnelling as the extraordinary extends into a warren of lateral workings following beneath the tidal river.  The capital explodes in construction of both residential and commercial projects in spite of challenging weather conditions.

Even more brightly painted plant and cranes provide a jolly spectacle for us riverside residents. They ply with the essential power of the tides along the 30-mile long, underground construction site, popping up like moles distributing the spoil along the proposed route down stream.  Each major operator is defined in strong, corporate colour schemes.

New ceiling001

Meanwhile in cultural Greenwich, revised corporate identities proclaim the Painted Hall’s more subtle rebranding which also hosted a dinner for the Polish tall ship crews.

Tilbury001

More tunnelling under tidal Thames between Tilbury and Gravesend to create a new super port in Essex.

David Warwick001

Farewell Peter Warwick (far right)

An upright gentleman of the river traditions slipped away after a long illness.  One of the organisers of the ‘Great River Race’, ‘Thames Alive’ and ‘The New Trafalgar Dispatch’ which was a re-enactment of the drama of Nelson’s final departure from the  Royal Steps at the Royal Naval College by river to St. Paul’s.  Peter Warwick organised similar historical enactments to celebrate Wellington and Waterloo – another of Peter’s heroes.  He was chairman of the 1865 Club.  His great enthusiasm will be much missed.

About RiverWatch returns

Peter Kent shares his Thames riverside studio viewpoint

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